Easy Virtual Assistant Jobs From Home For Moms

If you had been searching to earn a living while at home with your kids, here are 3 easy virtual assistant jobs from home for you:

Amazon Virtual Assistant

Duties are wide-ranging requiring you to perform many types of tasks including, data entry, web research, customer service, order processing, sourcing and many other tasks.

By experience, most employers do not require previous experience as an Amazon virtual assistant. Training is provided and the tools you would need are provided as well by the employer. The tasks may feel daunting at first but once you have processed all the information, the tasks are pretty much easy to do as you go on.

Social Media Virtual Assistant

There are employers that are only needing an extra hand to post things that are created into various Facebook pages or groups, Instagram and other social media platform that we already know and use on a daily basis.

Often times, photos and contents are already provided and will only be needed to schedule for posting to that which is incredibly perfect for moms looking for very flexible working hours.

Additional tasks may be added from time to, like interacting and responding to people’s comments and queries. This job is the most ideal and very easy virtual assistant job from home for moms.

Research and Content Writer

If you are highly articulate in writing, then this is another easy and ideal job for you. Ideally, most employers would prefer someone with a decent knowledge of SEO or digital marketing. But as with other jobs, there are a lot of employers also willing to consider candidates who are willing to be trained and willing to put in the work and research relevant topics required for the job.

Having been a career woman before becoming a mother, it was a no-brainer choice to become a stay at home mom for our son. However, as it had been nearly 4 years, I could not shake off the feeling of needing to do something that would make me feel more fulfilled as a person. There was always this feeling of wanting to go back to having a career but at the same time, also wanting to be there for my child. After some thorough research, I delved into the world of being a virtual assistant or remote employee.

Work-At-Home Hacks For People Just Like Me

There are rules of thumb but there are no hard and fast rules. The ‘things people do every day to become successful’ in what they do has so many variables.

Some swear by morning coffees, others a 20-minute nap. Give or take, that’s almost always the story. Like I said, variables.

Routine, or better yet, discipline is what makes people successful. I will never claim to be a ‘successful person’ but what I HAVE been doing is working from home for the past 18 years. I hope you can share YOUR story about how you soften the rough edges off of your everyday work week too because it helps. Every little bit of advice helps, actually, because most successful people listen.

1. No Emails – Most people start their days off by rolling off their beds with everyone screaming at them. Your alarm is screaming. Your boss is screaming, your kids are screaming, your email is screaming. So, one of the things that I DON’T do early in the morning is to check my emails. People who know me know not to expect an instant reply from me early in the morning. That’s when I am trying to sort my shit together so that I can get stuff done for you throughout the day. So, no emails in the morning. Only coffee is allowed.

2. Stay Dressed – This one is for those who work from home. One of the things that I’ve noticed in nearly 2 decades is that I dress for work (even if I will be in my home office or living room) the whole time I am going to be working. I don’t know about you but the moment I slip on my cutesy ‘lil comfy clothes, my zest for life and roaring enthusiasm to get things done slithers off from me like a layer of dead skin cell.

3. Meditate -Oprah’s said it. So did Deepak Chopra and Cameron Diaz. It’s not the woo-woo-woo stuff, trust me. It’s more like sitting there in complete silence or with soft music gently caressing my ear, or just sweeping the floor (the movement is meditatively repetitive, try it!). Instead of thinking of it as a ‘new age fad’, think of it as Loading Your Gun Ready to Kick Down the Doors of the World. Badass when reworded, huh? I use an app to ‘help me along’ – Insight Timer. It has music, guided meditation, and… well… complete silence.

4. Don’t multitask – It’s something I was really proud of and multitasking was the only way for me to move the needle forward when the list of things-to-do was just way too long. I don’t do it anymore. Instead, I think doing things in spurts is far more productive. One example would be that if I found vacuuming the floor THE daunting task of the day, I would mindfully vacuum the living room and leave the rooms and kitchen for tomorrow.

Silly example, I know, but when applied to work, it’s pretty amazing when you give the tasks at hand short bursts of active, productive attention. When I am tired, I will come back with a whole lot more to contribute AFTER I’ve dealt with my brain fog instead of muscling through it. I mean, who am I to argue with the chemicals in my brain?

5. Coffee – I am just going to leave this right here. Explaining it any further is going to make me angry if you don’t understand it. It’s my survival poison.

6. Laugh a Little – A sense of humor provides a buffer against the build-up of stress and anxiety in your system. So, occasionally, load up your Tumblr or Twitter (where you are encouraged to follow people like 9gag – just a personal preference, of course) and just laugh a little.

Experts say that humor provides a powerful buffer against stress and fear. “Humor is about playing with ideas and concepts,” said Martin, who teaches at the University of Western Ontario. “So whenever we see something as funny; we’re looking at it from a different perspective. When people are trapped in a stressful situation and feeling overwhelmed, they’re stuck in one way of thinking: This is terrible. I’ve got to get out of here. But if you can take a humorous perspective, then by definition you’re looking at it differently – you’re breaking out of that rigid mind-set.”

7. Being understanding – I know this doesn’t fit into the normal mold of ‘things people do to be successful’ but I think it’s pretty important. Because most of us work with others, whether in the office or remotely, we often assume that people are being evil of mean when they’re being a little less than nice to us. Sometimes, it’s because they’re tired just like you, exhausted just like you, overwhelmed just like you, have to pay bills just like you, are worried about their kids/parents just like you, or simply had an argument with a friend/spouse just like you.

I think this point is particularly important in the digital world. With the digital divide, we sometimes forget that we’re dealing with human beings. Just like you.

Marsha Maung is a mother, writer, social media consultant, internet marketer and human. Her mission, as far as her work is concerned, is to bring brands, products, services and companies exposure. Find out more about her life from her personal blog (cooking, life, sense, parenting, writing, etc) or her professional WordPress blog MarshaMaung.Me. Hope to see you and connect there.

Looking To Start A Working From Home Job

Digital technology-email and smartphones most of all-have vastly improved workers’ capacity to be productive outside of a traditional office. Even so, most white-collar work still happens in an office. In practice, modern communications technology is used just as much to link physical workplaces together-as at Slate, which maintains two offices, one in New York and one in D.C.-as to disperse them. One reason is that, according to a new survey of office workers conducted by Wakefield Research for the IT consulting company Citrix, most bosses are dubious about the telecommuting. Half of workers say their boss disapproves of remote working, and only 35 percent say it’s tolerated.

Skeptical bosses will likely have their doubts re-enforced by the same survey, which shows that 43 percent of workers say they’ve watched TV or a movie while “working” remotely, while 35 percent have done household chores, and 28 percent have cooked dinner.

Physical proximity might not be necessary for much work, but it does remain a hard-to-replace deterrent against The Price Is Right while on the clock.

My experience working primarily from home for an extended period several years back was that it’s a surprisingly efficient way to drive yourself insane. The need to make petty decisions-where to work, which chair to sit in, should I even bother to get out of bed, do I need to be wearing shoes right now-became overwhelming. I’d spend completely unreasonable amounts of time wondering what to do for lunch, and while working on a book dedicated a surprising amount of energy to meeting my self-imposed daily word quota in time to catch movie matinees.

But there is also a compelling case to make that working at home makes people much more efficient, because it allows workers to take care of annoying little chores while still getting their jobs done. Remote working-at least occasional remote working-can be great precisely because of the opportunity it affords to get a certain amount of non-work stuff done. It’s much faster to shop for groceries at a quarter to three than to stand in line during the after-work rush. Far too many people work similar schedules and want to eat dinner at dinnertime. My neighborhood supermarket turns into a nightmare from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday late afternoon, another popular shopping time, is even worse, with the aisles often featuring Soviet-style shortages of key commodities. If you just start working a bit earlier (no commute, after all) and pop by the store during a lull when lines are short, you can get both more work and more shopping done in a fixed amount of time. Even better, if more people did that, then shift workers with genuinely inflexible schedules might also be spared some line pain.

And telecommuting allows you to tackle household tasks that take up a lot of time but don’t actually involve much work. Watching laundry spin in your washer or dryer is perfectly compatible with productive work. But between the washing step and the drying step comes a time-sensitive “put the wet clothing in the drier” phase. Taking just a few minutes off from work to do the swap lets you get the chore done efficiently, and leaves your actual leisure time free for exciting activities like leaving the house. Many recipes, similarly, involve considerable periods of simmering or roasting during which it’s good to be around the house but you don’t actually have to do anything. In a “work-then-shop-then-cook-then-eat” paradigm, it’s challenging to eat anything that can’t be made quickly. But if you can simmer while you work, then a lot of household labor can be accomplished with minimal reduction in professional output.

The fact that such practices remain officially taboo reflects how far we haven’t come as a society from the days when we expected every full-time professional to be backstopped by a full-time homemaker.

More broadly the Wakefield survey suggests that employers may be missing a low-cost way to give workers something of value. Sixty-four percent of survey respondents who haven’t worked remotely “identify at least one extremely popular perk or pleasure they’d be willing to give up in order to work from home just one day a week.” The fundamental fact of the modern economy is that no matter how much technology advances or society’s wealth improves, we don’t add more hours to the day and we still need to sleep. Under the circumstances, tactics that help people save time are not only valuable but increasingly so with every passing year. Smart firms need to find ways to acknowledge that and let their employees have enough flexibility to manage their time effectively.